Food Rescue and Redistribution with Aloha Harvest

Leslie Pyo and Jay Purvis discuss how Aloha Harvest distributes over one million pounds of rescued food every year.

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Austin Hattox:
Today we're going to be speaking with two guests from Aloha Harvest, Leslie Pyo, community resource coordinator, and Jay Purvis, data and communication specialist. Guys, welcome to show.

Leslie Pyo:
Thank you.

Jay Purvis:
Hello, thanks for having us.

Austin Hattox:
For those in our audience who aren't already familiar, could you talk a little about Aloha Harvest and what you guys do?

Leslie Pyo:
Yeah, Aloha Harvest is a food rescue and redistribution nonprofit. We are the largest organization of our kind in Hawaii. We basically rescue excess food from places like grocery stores, wholesale distributors, restaurants. We rescue from about 250 per year, and then we redistribute that food free of charge to places like nonprofits and social service agencies that are feeding our communities. We work with about 175 of those organization.

Austin Hattox:
I saw on your website that you guys have reduced over 24 million pounds of food since starting in 1999. Are those numbers still accurate?

Leslie Pyo:
Yep, accurate and going up every month during COVID. First month of COVID, we saw a 50% increase in how much we rescued and redistributed compared to the previous year. The next month 78% increase and last month 66% increase, so 24 million and sharply increasing now.

Austin Hattox:
That is an astronomical amount of food to deal with in a normal year, and then now I guess it's becoming even crazier. Where does the food come from and where does it go?

Leslie Pyo:
Yeah, so it comes from a big network. We have the most number of connections of I think any organization in our state. So that network of 250 donors includes like, Foodland is a very prevalent grocery store that's everywhere in Hawaii. We rescue from almost all of the Foodlands on Oahu where we're based. We rescue from restaurants and a lot of the wholesale distributors, in addition to companies that throw catered events and even individuals. We'll have people who have a mango tree and too many mangoes, and they'll ask if they can give it to us because it's still excess food.

Leslie Pyo:
Just to emphasize, I feel like when people hear rescue food, they might think of food that it's about to go bad or it's not something you want to eat, but we would never rescue food we ourselves wouldn't eat. It's more often, it's food that just didn't get sold or didn't get eaten and it's perfectly good. It's cool because we actually are able to save money for the food donors that we rescue from, because it actually costs money to dispose the food, and instead we pick it up free and then deliver it free. So you asked where it goes.

Leslie Pyo:
So a lot of the nonprofits and social service agencies that we deliver to, their sole mission is not just feeding people. A lot of them are actually rehabilitation programs in some sense, whether it's education, or housing or mental health. And by providing free food, they're able to reallocate more of their budget to those other holistic set of services that they offer. Some of them do feedings like church pantries and stuff, but a lot of them it's cool because they actually work more holistically with the population that they serve.

Austin Hattox:
Are the locations where you deliver food, are they primarily on Oahu or the greater Hawaii?

Leslie Pyo:
Yeah. So as of right now, we do only work on Oahu, but we have a goal to expand to all of the neighbor islands within the next several years.

Austin Hattox:
Excellent. What does that look like logistically for you guys, when you're moving around such massive amounts of food?

Jay Purvis:
So how it looks for picking up food, is there are multiple routes that are given to different drivers. And these routes are made by our amazing operations manager, Mele, and she takes a lot of qualitative and quantitative information to determine where the food is and where it needs to go. This information comes from understanding the size and the needs of certain recipient agencies. It also comes from knowing what food producers we have on deck, who have extra food or are providing us food as a donation.

Jay Purvis:
And then we assign these routes to the drivers and the drivers will go out to pick up food. And they actually have an app that's called Capture OnTheGo, where they will document the pounds of food that they pick up. They follow their assigned route to drop off that food at a recipient agency, which as Leslie said, can be anything from a homeless shelter that feeds folks that are actively living outside, to rehabilitation homes, things like that. And they will track how much food they drop off at each location live in the field.

Jay Purvis:
At that point, that data actually comes into a relational database that we have hosted on site at our office, and we can actually see live the numbers coming in from which area, and which route to which recipient agency, which we then can look at trends over time based on like how much we're getting from Foodland, as Leslie mentioned, to what types of agencies the food ends up getting to. And that's something we want to develop more and understand better, so we can make sure that redistribution happens in a way that affects the people that need it the most.

Austin Hattox:
Interesting. Okay. And so is Capture OnTheGo specifically for this sort of food delivery model, or is it like just moving large amounts of items around?

Jay Purvis:
I don't know if it's made specifically just for food rescue. I'm not sure if it has other capabilities.

Austin Hattox:
Okay. But it allows you guys to kind of stay on top of your information, and get a better sense of like where everything's going and maybe get trends over time, and figure out where you need to focus or where would be a good place to allocate food moving forward?

Jay Purvis:
Yeah, absolutely. It lets us know the weight of where we're getting things and where they end up.

Leslie Pyo:
Yeah, it's not physically built for food rescue. And since I know that this is a podcast where you're speaking to other nonprofit leaders and people wanting to understand the inner workings, it's worth mentioning that we're actually looking at Salesforce as a replacement for Capture OnTheGo, and we happen to be doing it in the midst of COVID-19 which makes things fun. Yeah.

Austin Hattox:
Interesting. So why are you guys evaluating Salesforce?

Leslie Pyo:
Basically just looking to ... And Jay can tag on to this as well, but looking for a more robust system to capture better data so that we can better do what Jay was saying we already do, which is like make sure the food actually gets to where it's most needed. But we know that we can do that even better and Salesforce is obviously just known. And fun fact, which I didn't know until I started here, but nonprofits actually get, is it five lessons Jay, for free? Of course, you have to pay for any specialization or customization, but the base level of Salesforce nonprofits can get for free.

Leslie Pyo:
Yeah, basically just looking to capture better data in a better way, and not just for the actual food rescue part of our process. But obviously there's a lot of other information that gets tracked and goes into it, from involving volunteers, to just admin to financial donors. So we're wanting a solution like Salesforce that can offer one repository for all of that data.

Austin Hattox:
Is there any specific data that you guys are trying to better capture that you think Salesforce is more attuned for?

Jay Purvis:
One of the things that we want to do is build our ability to redistribute the food, like I said to the folks who need it most. Currently, the way we do that a lot of times is that the drivers can make last second decisions based on their institutional knowledge of where they're at, and who often will need things. One of the things we've been talking about developing is the ability for drivers to select some criteria of the food that they currently have, and then have a populated list of agencies that could accept that food based on their ability to refrigerate their number of folks or things like that, that will help us get the food out more to folks who need it, and have a more centralized decision making process in that way.

Austin Hattox:
Okay. So this would be a greater CRM focus, and you guys could really dig down and get into the specifics of your different locations where the food can go to, and what their capabilities are in terms of what food they need and how they could handle it better.

Jay Purvis:
Definitely, and the demographics of the recipient agencies that they're going to so we can say, "Oh, we've been fed approximately this many folks who are homeless, or over a certain age." Because right now, we don't really have that information, not on a live drop by drop basis. So being able to tease that out, would really help us understand who we're serving in a better way.

Austin Hattox:
Are you guys using any CRM at all right now, or is it primarily the Capture OnTheGo app?

Leslie Pyo:
Primarily Capture OnTheGo.

Austin Hattox:
Okay. Shifting gears a little bit. So you're moving a lot of stuff around. Obviously, you have different drivers and different routes in a lot of locations. How do volunteers work into this bigger picture of Aloha harvest.

Leslie Pyo:
Yeah, so prior to COVID-19, one of our biggest ... Well really just for some context, our volunteer program really got started in a serious way last fall. When I came on board prior to that there just wasn't really the capacity for a bit to have much of a volunteer program. One of the biggest programs we had before COVID was we have tons of farmers markets all across the island. Volunteers, there be lead volunteers and the people who helped them building relationships with those local farmers and saying, "Hey, if you're not able to sell all your produce, and this market is on a Sunday, and there won't be another market, you can sell it until Wednesday. If you're just going to feed this to livestock or you basically not going to use it. Can we take it instead and we'll drive it to a nearby, one of our recipient agencies."

Leslie Pyo:
So we were at four markets weekly. Prior to COVID, our volunteers also help out with administrative tasks in the office, or now that COVID has hit remotely. We actually just recently launched a few weeks ago, our a new volunteer platform that we purchased galaxy digital to help with the back end of management, its software, as well as the user experience making it easier for me to match volunteers with specific opportunities, according to their skill, and availability, and other factors, and making it easier from the volunteer, and to find the types of opportunities that makes sense for them. So that's been really exciting. During COVID Obviously, we've taken off a lot of our volunteer activity that would require people to go out and about, but we have expanded it to where people who are fluent in Korean or Japanese can volunteer to help be translators with some of our recipient agencies where that might be the primary language, and having someone who can translate email, or phone actually is hugely helpful.

Leslie Pyo:
We are asking volunteers to help with basic data entry, or cleaning and validation and assistance to Jay, volunteers who can help design materials, little blurbs for social media, or updating the look of our website, volunteers who will copy edit materials that we're submitting, just another set of eyes. Then we do have some that require volunteers to go out because we do have to still feed people, right. So there are food distribution events where volunteers can go, and help do anything from labeling boxes to carrying the bags of food to the backs of the recipients trunks as they line up in their cars. So it's been pretty wide ranging and it took us a minute to adjust to COVID, and create those new types of opportunities, but we're up and running again in that respect of utilizing volunteers.

Austin Hattox:
Okay. Obviously, you've touched on this a couple times already. COVID has changed everything. Would you say that the big difference for you guys is how you utilize your volunteers, as well as the amount of food you guys have coming in, and you're distributing now that the Coronavirus is reality?

Leslie Pyo:
Yeah, I'll speak to that a bit. Then Jay if you have anything you want to add feel free. But it changed the amount of food we rescue, and even just with volunteers, not just how we utilize them, but we biked. I'm sure a lot of nonprofits experienced this as well. While people were either working from home, so have more flexibility, or some furloughed, or some not even able to work. We had a really big spike in people wanting to volunteer, so we tripled the amount of volunteers in our system since the time that COVID started. But also in addition to those things, we've also temporarily expanded beyond just food rescue and redistribution. So we've partnered with the USDA Farm to families program, where we're not just delivering excess food anymore, we're actually providing the service of our refrigerated trucks to get that food that's being sent from USDA to the different nonprofits we already have relationship with.

Leslie Pyo:
So being like a connector where we can help them facilitate their food distribution event, which in the past, we always leave it to, "We'll give you the food." We leave it to the recipients to organize the distribution. But now during COVID because we have refrigerated trucks, and sometimes at the distribution event they need, right? They need refrigeration, they're on site for a while. Then we'll we'll Park one of our trucks there and reroute the other ones to accommodate that we can still do our regular stuff. We've also started purchasing food directly from local farmers, and local businesses, which again, in the past, we always just rescue, but temporarily, we've applied for grants and funding, because we recognize that if the primary food supply chain suffers, and farmers aren't able to sustain their operations, then everyone's going to go hungry, right? Not just the people who already were, or who have been hit by COVID. But everyone's going to go down. So we've re-invested some of our funds toward actually directly purchasing food to then redistribute rather than just picking up excess.

Jay Purvis:

I'll just add to the volunteers. Now, I was not with the company before COVID happened. I joined the team in May. But one of the things I did notice with the volunteers were that they had a lot of qualifications, and a lot of time, and a lot of eagerness to use that time in a helpful way. That's been a really powerful experience for me working directly with volunteers who were working in the airline industry, or have advanced degrees. These are folks that really wanted to use the skills that they had made in the workforce not able to have an income from, and giving it back to Aloha Harvest. So I've been working with data experts on my data projects with these volunteers. It's been a really wonderful experience to have folks give so much of their time, I'll be in a sad situation and hopefully, will change eventually. But that's been a really powerful thing for me to see firsthand.

Austin Hattox:
Excellent. It sounds like there have been, obviously COVID is a great hardship and everybody's being affected really significantly. It sounds like things like the volunteer aspect of your program, and the food distribution, the impact the people you guys are able to reach is doing well. All things considered. What would you say is the largest obstacle right now that you guys are encountering, while you're trying to make a difference?

Jay Purvis:
That's a good question. I feel like you can candidly I don't know, it takes me a minute to think of that because honestly, our executive director is amazing. His name's Phil, and something he definitively did, when everything started getting bad. He took this mode of like, we're not going to take a beat. We're not going to wait and see, this is the time we are needed more than ever, food insecurity is about to go off the charts. It already was bad. We're just going to go from 100 to 1000 right now. Just being honest, that was his approach. We just dove in and as you mentioned everything has massively increased. We just haven't really thought about what the limitations are. Because we just dove in. Jay, you might be able to talk to it better since you came in May in the midst of our insanity, and have been amazing.

Jay Purvis:
Well, it has been really great to see an organization that has not just the desire to step up. But the ability to that really comes from a steady hand of leadership, and a deep understanding of our community needs that you cannot just walk into, you have to have institutional knowledge. Phil actually has a background, working with homelessness in the state. I think that really lent him to be especially effective in this period of time that is about more than just food. It's about the intersectionality with poverty and inequality that we already were experiencing here in Hawaii. For me, the challenges have been that because the need is rising so quickly, capturing what's going on in a quantitative way, which is what I really want to do so we can see what we're doing, and what we can do. It's been very difficult. One of the initiatives that I was trying to expand was collecting data from food recipients who were receiving the Farmers to Families Food Box Program that Leslie brought up. It seems when you hear it easy to do, collect the name and a couple demographic factors about these people receiving these food boxes.

Jay Purvis:
But we actually have been doing food distributions at dozens of different sites. Some of these sites have full staff, and they are used to distributing food. They have volunteers. It's very smooth. We have other sites where we have language barriers, or run by two or three volunteers, and they're having to explain to folks who English is not their first language, how to write the number of people in their household, and also trying to make data collection happen in food distribution events that are being safe from COVID. We're not trying to have people have an interview about this stuff. We created a program where we're actually handing out data cards for people to complete. But it's very difficult with all these different sites. All these different levels of need, and administrative backup, to be able to collect the data on who we're getting these food products to. The needs are changing every day, right?

Jay Purvis:
Some sites we've had, might have to close because there's an outbreak in COVID, and how to respond to that, and then redistribute the food from there. It's a lot of evolving things, and trying to be able to not miss this moment where we can understand the impact food rescue can have on a community. That's something I really bear on my shoulders, and I'm trying to adapt to in a very changing environment.

Austin Hattox:
Yeah, I think that's a great point. You have all these tools available to you, all these capabilities, and a lot of times you want to use them to the highest standard that you can, get the most value out of the tool. A lot of times it's gathering the data and actually be able to put it into one place, and the human element almost can make it difficult, and that you have to how to mash these things together so that you can collect this data, and you can, it helps inform how you can continue to focus your mission, and really take advantage of the situation right now.

Jay Purvis:
Absolutely. That's one thing I've actually started to do data training at each site prior to the data distribution, the data collection, just because it allows me to understand what each recipient agency is doing, and facing, and distributing food, the barriers that they're going to encounter. Also for me not to lose sight that the point of this is that these folks get food to the people who need it, and that I can't come on this top down approach of, "I need these numbers or else." That's not how you engage and encourage your community members. One of the most exciting things that I've been able to see in just the two months I'm here is, these sites that have gotten really excited about collecting data, and they send me these amazing spreadsheets. They're clean, they're organized, are so proud to send it to me, and giving them empowered for what that can do for them moving forward and getting more food, and helping their community more has been really exciting. I like to make sure as a community oriented data person that that's the site that we keep in mind.

Leslie Pyo:

We can talk a bit Jay and I about the reporting tools, because it might be useful for people listening for reports are first starting to report on that data in a way that we never were before COVID. So basically, prior to COVID, which in a way on the whole theme of it being such a difficult time, but also there being bright spots coming out of it, and as far as what it catalyzes, we had never consistently released public reports on our activity. It was more an issue of just capacity. our capacity to do that with our team. We prior to Jay, had three in the office. But we started doing that because it was just necessary for funding, and just for connection with our community and even ourselves, that process of gathering it up and putting it into a public facing document was just helpful. While we were increasing so much, and Piktochart was what I started with. It has a free version that I use for our first report.

Leslie Pyo:
It's just very ... If you're needing an easy solution for visualizing your data, and connecting with your community. I really loved using it. It's easy to understand, and intuitive, and has a lot of different tools, inserting charts directly into your report that you can just import data from a spreadsheet to create, and then have lots of elements from something like Canva as well, where even if you don't consider yourself, I'm a graphic designer, you can still use the basic tools of graphic design in an easy way. Then their pro version basically just expands the capability a bit, and allows you to export in high quality PDF which we ended up moving toward, but Jay is going to move us toward something even better. If you want to talk about that Jay.

Jay Purvis:
Sure. I have absolutely love Piktochart chart like Leslie talks about. My passion is to demystify data and to not make it seem like such a scary, boring topic. What I really like about Piktochart has been that we're able to present data in a narrative way in a pictorial way, in a colorful way. Leslie is an amazing graphic designer, and she's always making sure our colors and everything looks great, which is really important because the public can glaze over if they just see numbers. So really bringing those numbers to life. The additional step we're going to take is, I'm migrating our data into tableau, which is a business intelligence data visualization tool. So we can have our general public and stakeholders actually be able to interact with the data. So that means being able to log in to a dashboard, select the date, select a company, they want to see how much they've given over time.

Jay Purvis:
They can pull that from a drop down menu, they can visualize it. Beyond that, I've actually been speaking with other food security advocates throughout the state, and we actually want to collaborate to build an aggregated center of data, where there's an aggregated dashboard where everybody can go to understand food security throughout the state, and understand how different recipient, and donor agencies are interacting with the food supply chain to address issues of hunger, and lack of food access. So, I really love tableau. I've used it a lot before. I like that Tableau public is free and open source. I love how it tacks on to the idea that data should be for everybody, and everybody has the ability to understand data, just give them the right tools. That's really what I'm trying to build with our dashboards is anyone can jump on here. They can make some fun pie charts, they can think about it, they can download the images, take it for their own reporting, what other projects they want to do, and we can all work together to try and understand the demographics, and the impact of what we're doing.

Austin Hattox:
I love that I feel 100% the same way where, if you're just looking at a spreadsheet, it's easy to just get lost in the numbers. Your eyes glaze over almost a little bit, even if it's really good data, but being able to visualize it, and put it in some intuitive, almost it feels a little more physical, feels a little more real form. It really helps connect people with what's actually going on, and what this information means.

Jay Purvis:

Absolutely. I really do think of this, as in some ways, a life or death situation, when it comes to inequality and poverty. Time is of the essence to understand what's happening, and any stopgap in that which happens a lot with academic research, and data that stops good policies, and going forward because the numbers are just inaccessible, or they're held in a peer reviewed paper that you have to pay to access. I love, just mess with that and just trying to get good data from the people, from the community, to the people who need it to make decisions about helping alleviate this issue.

Austin Hattox:
Those visualizations, is that something that you guys are going to distribute through your website, and your various correspondence with some of your partners ? Or how are you going to get that information to the people?

Leslie Pyo:
So this is actually something we've been talking a lot with our executive director, about retraining people from these PDFs, which are our monthly impact reports they've been getting that breakdown all of our big numbers, we're adding new elements every month. We just added one element this month, where we translated roughly the amount of CO2 emissions that come from all of the food that we rescued, how much we diverted, in terms of people understand, how many smartphones could this have charged, and how many cars could this have powered for a year, and we've been distributing those in PDFs that are uploaded to our website, email to our stakeholders and our board, and then promoted on our social media website.

Leslie Pyo:
As we're migrating to dashboards, we're making the impact report more data centric, trying to train people to be looking at it less as a newsletter and more as, "Oh, here's some numbers that we can process and apply to something." Eventually, once we make our dashboards live, those will be accessible on our website, we will probably still make a static report to distribute to board members or potential branches, things like that. With tableau, you can always export a static image of maybe our top line numbers, or changes over time, things like that we would probably maintain as a static PDF that we distribute, or have loaded on our website, but otherwise really direct people to the website, dashboard area where they can get in, and play with the numbers, and promote that to other data agencies who may be interested in pulling some of that data for their own needs as well.

Austin Hattox:
Yeah. I feel like that's a really cool idea where it will differentiate you guys in a way because I haven't seen that functionality on any other nonprofit website I've seen. I think that interactivity element would really draw people in like, "Hey, what is this?" And "Wow, this is really interesting. I've never been able to do this, it's a transparency thing, almost of, "How cool that they're letting me purlin and understand this in a way that I wouldn't be able to for most organizations."

Jay Purvis:
Well, that's great to hear. That's what I want to do. I want to give these data back to the people and actually in tableau, folks can download anonymized data sets from the dashboard. So other agencies or nonprofits who are trying to understand the issue themselves can actually use that data. Researchers can use the data, giving it back to the people and that's really what I think is the best way to solve such a complex issue like poverty and food insecurity.

Austin Hattox:
This is zooming out a little bit. But where do you guys see Aloha Harvest in five years?

Leslie Pyo:
Love it. This is one of Phil's favorite things to talk about, our executive director. But I mean, it'll be interesting thing now that COVID we're going through it, and where it leaves us, but definitely want to have expanded to all the neighbor islands, or at least made significant progress. Food resiliency we have is something that we've been talking about before COVID hit, and now is more relevant than ever, especially as we're entering hurricane season, because I don't know if we clarified it earlier, but all of our food rescue and redistribution take place on the same day each day. So we do it seven days a week, but we don't hold food overnight. That's part of what differentiates us from places like a food pantry or Food Bank. They're ones who we give it to and they store it, but on a route our drivers, that's part of what Jay was talking about with their in the moment decision.

Leslie Pyo:
Because as much as they plan for, "Okay, this is where I'm going to pick up from and then drop to today." They don't know for sure what they're going to get until they get it. So then like Jay said, they have to think about, well, "I'm getting fresh produce, and this agency has a kitchen and they can prepare it so well. I'll go a mile off route and drop it there." Or, "This is prepared food, and I know that this church is doing meal distribution tonight, so I'm going to drop it there." Stuff like that. Whereas we want to within the next five years expand to having food resiliency hubs at different points on the island, where we actually can store food, and even the dream would be having kitchen space, where we can expand to having volunteers and partners, start cooking and preparing the rescued food before it actually goes out, because sometimes, as much as we'd like to think all the rescue food ends up getting used, it's not always a perfect match, right? If recipients get a bag of cabbage, it's not necessarily guaranteed that they're going to cook it, or something else, it's hard to make a meal from that.

Leslie Pyo:
So we want to have those hub both for the sake of storage, and the ability to help prepare the food. So it definitely does get used. Also, just from the lens of instead of having to depend on our refrigerated trucks to drive, and cover the whole island over the course of a week, cutting down the amount of driving that has to happen, do a thing with data, giving data back to the people giving a resource base, the community where it is, can take ownership of that, we help with, but it's their space and we'll provide rescue food, and there's kitchen facilities. That's a space where they can have more ownership in the food that they are receiving, and then what they do with it. Those are two big things that come to mind.

Austin Hattox:
Got you. This next question, I think would be interesting to hear both of your perspectives since Jay is a little newer, and then Leslie, you've been involved with the organization for a while. If you could go back in time to before you got involved with Aloha Harvest, what would you tell yourself?

Leslie Pyo:
So for some context, I started in November, beginning of November. So I think I'm in my eighth month now. It was also, this job was my transition into nonprofit work. Prior to this, I worked as the editor of a grassroots magazine in North Carolina, the idea was born about local women. I moved into nonprofit work because on the very idealistic principle, that I knew that I wanted the measure of success for work to be social impact that was benefiting people who have less resources than the rest of the community rather than profit. Very idealistic thinking of why but it's just true. Coming in here, if I could go back and tell myself something, it would probably be something along the lines of taking notes as I go of big things that I'm learning about what it means to be effective in a nonprofit space. So I feel like you can learn about nonprofits, and obviously, they're not a monolith. But there's definitely big things you learn about what it looks like to actually be effective in a nonprofit space.

Leslie Pyo:
It's very different culture than for profit spaces. I would just tell myself to take more notes as I go on what I'm learning, because it's so good, and rich, and applies to so much beyond just obviously, one career and one round, things that you learn working in a nonprofit apply to just living a good life. So that's what I would tell myself. Taking notes as I go.

Jay Purvis:
Leslie's actually really great at taking notes. So I mean, she always is great shared docs with all of her. She even takes [inaudible 00:35:14] my behalf. I think she's doing a great job with her note taking. I appreciate it actually. Yeah, I definitely relate to what Leslie was saying about having somewhat idealized goal for finding purpose in work. Before Aloha Harvest. I actually worked as a financial analyst at a major financial institution. So the thing that I would have told myself is just to be ready to wear many, many hats working in a full profit company, you have really defined roles. Your expectations are very defined and corporations run on everyone being a literal cog in the machine, if you will, and the nonprofit, you can't really get away with not understanding what your coworkers are doing, you can't silo yourself, I've had to continuously step outside my comfort zone, to be able to write social media posts, and to write in a way that the public will find is interesting. My background is also in academia.

Jay Purvis:
So I'm used to really dry writing. There's a lot of things that I've had to be open to, and be humble to learn from, knowing that the point is to help alleviate inequality, which is a very satisfying thing to have in your work. But just to prepare myself, and I am still new enough where I'm reminding myself this all the time, it's just that in order for me to be an effective team member, I really need to be able to step up to a lot of different roles. I actually have started delivering food sometimes, which is, I actually really like it. I get to borrow one of our company cars, and sometimes last minute food rescues, and it's great, and with all those moments where I can really see what it looks like to rescue food, to take from a farmer, to bring it to an agency to see who are the folks who actually received that food, being able to see all those different elements within the organization helped me understand how to do my job better as a data analyst, as somebody who is processing the numbers, and trying to change policy.

Jay Purvis:
So it's a challenging element of nonprofit work because we have a tiny staff for what we're doing. I mean, if you really think about all the roles that we have, it's so much, but it's also exciting, and it really can help develop all the skills that I'm working on and will hopefully make me successful in addressing this issue moving forward.

Austin Hattox:
Excellent. Yeah, I can definitely understand the need to take more notes and be a little more detailed, and on top of things, and then also this adaptability idea of we're all going to be wearing a lot of hats. So buckle up and get ready for the ride. So that's all the questions I've got for you guys today. Thanks so much for appearing on the show, and showing the impact that you guys are having with Aloha Harvest. If our listeners would like to find out more about you guys, where would be the best place to look online?

Leslie Pyo:
They can go to alohaharvest.org. We're also on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn so they can just search Aloha Harvest. If they have any questions about anything we brought up, Jay and I our email addresses are just our names at alohaharvest.org. My name is Leslie spelled L-E-S-L-I-E, Jays name is spelled J-A-Y. 
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